Mabel the Rescue Dog

Encourage Dog Lovers to Adopt ๐Ÿ’•

4 min read (Articles narrated by Mabel) Since Molly hasn’t been fostering lately, she has been helping out in other ways whenever she can. One of the biggest ways to help out is by attending events with dogs. The rescue she volunteers for has kennels at their office space for dogs who aren’t in foster …

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When I look over Molly’s shoulder as she scrolls through social media, I can’t help but notice that every time there’s a post about a foster dog, there are comments telling the person they should adopt their foster. While I’m sure they mean well, these comments do a lot more harm than good. They can be hurtful to humans who foster, so I’m going to discuss a few reasons why you should stop telling foster parents to “foster fail.” (Click title to read more!)

There are lots of heartwarming stories of two rescue dogs finding a home together. Tuck and Cuda, some of our former foster dogs, are a perfect example of that. A lot of times dogs are surrendered together or form new friendships with dogs at the rescue or shelter. When that happens, people who hear about them are eager to keep them together, but is that always the right decision? (Click title to read more!)

Most pet parents have heard the sayings “Adopt, Don’t Shop” and “Adopt or Shop Responsibly” at some point in their lives. These words are often used as hashtags on social media, and they’re sayings that I strongly support. However, I recently learned that there’s some controversy around them. (Click title to read more!)

Lately, Wisconsin has been having a lot of achievements when it comes to banning retail puppy sales. There are currently five cities in Wisconsin that have passed the humane pet store ordinance, and a sixth one is in the process. Molly recently attended a council meeting to support the ban on puppy sales in pet stores and to learn more information about these laws. (Click title to read more!)

Every time someone asks Molly how many dogs she’s fostered, she proudly says, “18!” By the time you read this post, it may be much higher than that because I know she’s not stopping there. She’s happy about the number of dogs she’s fostered because the higher that number is, the more dogs she has saved. (Click title to read more!)

For many humans, it’s difficult to understand the severity of puppy mills without seeing it firsthand. While I’ve never seen a puppy mill in real life, I’ve seen dogs that were rescued from them. Molly has fostered several dogs that came from bad breeding situations, and they’ve all had quirks and fears that most of our other foster dogs didn’t have. (Click title to read more!)